Idgie
       
     
Blue
       
     
Rosco
       
     
Maddie
       
     
Boba
       
     
Bella
       
     
Rosco and Maddie
       
     
Idgie and Blue
       
     
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Idgie
       
     
Idgie

48” x 48”. Oil on Canvas. 2018

Idgie, b. May 25, 2003

“I tell all my clients that Labradors are the best dogs to come home to. They are always happy to see you and Idgie is no exception! She celebrates our return with a happy hop, a kiss to an extended hand and walks a lazy circle in front of us to receive a scratch on the rump, even if we have just been out for a quick errand. If it’s been awhile since she’s seen you she’ll add in a softly exuberant whine for good measure. She has seen me through two graduations, three states, six moves and a wedding.. and I’ve cleaned her up after countless muddy puddles, lakes, and hikes. She has been an amazing trail dog her entire life - always happy to be outside, going double our distance, carrying her own pack and helping us find a lost trail by sniffing out the obscured path that has the most people scents to follow. She’s also a wonderful car companion on road trips and is warmly welcomed as our parents’ grand-dogger at all family occasions. Without question her absolute favorite past time is tennis balls. Sure, she loves to fetch a fresh fuzzy yellow one, but as a creaky elbow has slowed her down she now also finds pleasure in an easy game of catch from a few feet away, or chewing just right to get a good squeeze from an old ball. We used to need a Chuck-It to tire her out daily, these days she’s content with a couple of gentle tosses in the backyard and then sunning herself in the grass on a hot day with a tennis ball nearby.” - Erin

Blue
       
     
Blue

48” x 48”. Oil on Canvas. 2018

Blue, b. January 8 2007

“Blue came to us via our daughters thirteenth birthday present. When Katlynn and I found him it required a full on tantrum to get Dad to buy him. Shortly after that Blue picked Dad to be his Dad. He looks at Dad and I with adoring eyes at all times. He follows us to the kitchen, bathroom and bedroom with shadow like diligence. If he wants to rest, he puts his head on Dad’s foot to assure that he does not leave his sight. He is a little neurotic and protective of us, but he is our favorite dog ever. I have trouble swallowing as I talk about his importance to us.” - Tina

Rosco
       
     
Rosco

48” x 48”. Oil on Canvas. 2018

Rosco, b. June 8 2003, d. Jan 18 2018

“Rosco was the best dog of all time, I have so many memories, it’s difficult to make the rhyme.

Like the times you would pounce the tall grass, Or when we had to run from you passing gas!

Running tag team with Dodger at the dog park, You would play and go wild with nary a bark.

Spooning under the covers with mama, You kept us warm and relaxed amidst any drama.

You always reminded us to go for walks, Even in the bitter cold when you wore socks.

The hot summer sun for you was so grand, Sun bathing made your black fur the hottest in the land.

Your emotion was shown by your big pointy ears, Up and excited for ice cream, low and sympathetic if we had tears.

As a shop dog you would make your own bed, Your adventurous nature would sometimes make us red.

Our brown eyed boy made for a great big brother, Protective, interested, and excited to smother,

With kisses that is, big sloppy and wet, The way daddy likes it, I owe you a debt.

You taught be so much about love and having fun, I think of you always, especially in the warmth of the sun.

To say you hold a special place in my heart would be silly, You have the whole thing, I love you, really.”

- Clint

Maddie
       
     
Maddie

48” x 48”. Oil on Canvas. 2018

Maddie, b. May 1 2006, d. March 25 2018

Madeleine Sans Mouton Hooper Graham was a people person.

She found her calling early as the greeter at Ironton Studios, home to twenty artists. She went to work there almost every day. She liked artists. She liked parties. She liked school groups and they liked her. She would slip out of the studio and join the kids seated on the floor in the gallery, listening to the teacher and, probably, getting too much attention.

Maddie always wagged when you talked to her. If wagging is a dog’s way of laughing, she laughed a lot.

Gentle and polite, she was always generous, even to those who wanted to graze her food bowl. She would not take anything unless she was given permission. You could put groceries, even treats, in the car with her and they would remain untouched. Perhaps it was because she wanted company for those pleasures.

We didn’t teach her many tricks, but 'give me your paw' was one. She had great big paws, and you’d get one if there was a bit of toast (she liked toast) or when she sensed you were sad.

She clocked out at night. Not once did she wake us, the night watchman she was not. The tail would come back online in the morning after a sneeze and a stretch.

She was a city girl, knew the rules of the streets .The neighborhood merchants, the liquor store and the laundry and the real estate guy, all knew her. She knew where they were too, and would insist on going in, there were cookies and kind words.

She was named after Madeleine Albright, and she didn’t take kindly to fascists either.

This image of Maddie was taken just six days before she passed. Even then, you can tell how attentive she was, so person like, she listened with her eyes.

- Jill & Hugh

Boba
       
     
Boba

48” x 48”. Oil on Canvas. 2018

“Boba was what many people term a ‘foster failure,’ but what his auntie Andie prefers to call a ‘forever foster.’ Boba came home with me on impulse from a Golden Retriever rescue stationed outside an Akron, Ohio pet supply store one day in March of 2008. He had the softest ears, the most velvety snout, and deep, soulful eyes the color of melted chocolate. It was love at first sight.

Named for the infamous bounty hunter in Star Wars, Boba would have more accurately been called Chewbacca, since chewing was his favorite pastime and not always on authorized objects. Countless pairs of underwear, brand new boots, DVDs, frozen pizzas, and anything stuffed or fuzzy was fair game. I liked to joke that Boba was put into my life to make me more zen, to help me accept unexpected change and to simplify my life. He loved to play but rarely followed the rules and was constantly game for a belly rub. Boba was the happiest dog in the world, truly, and a puppy until the very end: all goofy smiles, knock-kneed and gangly legs, high-fives, and mischief.

Boba was diagnosed with degenerative myelopathy in the fall of 2017 and his decline was swift and heartbreaking. He made me smile until his very last moment before crossing the rainbow bridge, cheerfully gobbling up his milkshake, cheeseburgers, and fries even though he could no longer stand. Boba was a friend to all, a comedian, a guardian, and a daily example of how to live life in the moment and with joy.”

Bella
       
     
Bella

Installation Shot. Colorado Springs Fine Art Center.

48” x 48”. Oil on Canvas. 2018

Bella, b. 2006/2007?

“Bella reminds me what matters in life every day. When I first met her in 2009, Bella had just been rescued from a high kill shelter in Missouri. She had suffered from severe abuse and malnourishment, but the moment she came to my house she brightened up around my other animals. She let my senior cat be her alpha, tenderly following him around the house licking him across the face as he permitted. I believe that she knew how lucky she was to be given a second chance and wanted to share that joy with those around her. And despite everything that people had done wrong to her, she still had the capacity to forgive. Bella continues to be the sweetest dog I have ever met and is a fabulous matriarch to my other four rescues.” - Monique

Rosco and Maddie
       
     
Rosco and Maddie

Installation Shot. Colorado Springs Fine Art Center. 2018.

Idgie and Blue
       
     
Idgie and Blue

Installation Shot. Colorado Springs Fine Art Center. 2018.

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