INTERVIEWED BY MICHAEL KEEN FOR HIS PODCAST, POWERED BY ART by Monique Crine

I had the sincere please this past week to be interviewed by Michael Keen for his Podcast, Powered by Art. He writes:

Artist Monique Crine joins us to discuss the creation of her art, the importance of identity and the evolving roll of photography in her work and in the world. Crine’s oil paintings and photographs elicit a sense of connected nostalgia which allows the viewer to become personally invested in the subject of the work while still remaining on the outside.

Here’s the link. Enjoy!

http://www.poweredbyart.org/episode-10-artist-monique-crine/

JFK3, JFK4, and JFK6, have been chosen for the “Painting in the World: Reflections on Politics, Violence, and Reconciliation” at the Northern Arizona University Art Museum by Monique Crine

Curated by Dr. George V. Speer, Director of the NAU Art Museum, “Painting in the World: Reflections on Politics, Violence, and Reconciliation” opens September 18 and closes November 22. The NAU Art Museum believes that the global community faces a turning point today in which economic, environmental, and ethnic pressures threaten the integrity of whole societies.  The Arab Spring, wars arising from religious extremism and, conversely, the efforts of many nations to maintain stable, consensual societies are among the themes they hope to address in this exhibition.

Michael Paglia reviews ithaca by Monique Crine

“Crine’s photo-realist paintings, on the north wall, are all based on photos of her father taken between 1960 and 1970. They depict moments from his life in high school, in the military, and after the birth of a child. Crine’s father was very photogenic, with nearly a movie star’s level of visual charisma, as seen in “Richard 1961″ (pictured), but that’s just one reason these paintings succeed; another would be the fact that Crine is a consummate craftswoman, and the paintings are thus technically superb.”

The full review can be read at:

http://www.westword.com/2014-02-13/culture/ithaca-at-pirate-review/

“DAN” FEATURED IN DWELL’S MARCH 2014 ISSUE! by Monique Crine

My 2010 painting, Dan, was featured in Dwell’s March 2014 Issue. The painting is owned by Brandon and Amy Phillips, the talented founders of Miles and May Furniture in Geneva, NY. The article profiled the furniture makers and the renovation of their 65000 square ft 19th century factory.

http://www.dwell.com/my-house/article/19th-century-livework-factory-new-york


HARVARD LECTURE ON FEB 13 by Monique Crine

I will be presenting my work and hosting a workshop at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design on Feb 13. Please follow the link for more information:

http://www.gsd.harvard.edu/#/events/lecture-painting-workshop-monique-crine.html

NEW WORK AT PIRATE – ITHACA by Monique Crine

Pirate: Contemporary Art is pleased to present “Ithaca,” an exhibition of new works by Monique Crine, Leah Thomason Bromberg, and Jillian Piccirilli.

 

Currently based on the West Coast, the three artists were first brought together while studying painting at Cornell University in Ithaca, NY. Their disparate work was, and still is, bound by a commonly held preoccupation with idiocentric family histories set against broader notions of identity, home, and belonging. Each artist’s studio practice shares an interest in the intersection between painting and photography, both as a medium and an artifact. Pairing these forms with highly personal subject matter, the exhibited works are a study in the issues and implications of nostalgia.

Crine’s newest paintings are based on photographs taken of the artist’s father between 1960 – 1970. The work invites speculation into the identity of an individual, while also exploring the aesthetic constructions of formal and informal photography. Bromberg’s current work focuses on the moments of arrival and departure: between life and death,

coming or leaving home, packing and unpacking. Her imagery is mined from family photographs and cell phone snapshots, and her story lines draw upon personal experience, her Southern hometown, and her Navajo heritage. And in her recently completed series “Hemland,” Piccirilli translates her maternal family’s experience of their ancestral home Sweden through travel photographs, letters, and artifacts into hand-painted cyanotypes.

Pirate: Contemporary Art is an eclectic and audacious artist-run cooperative gallery, located in downtown Denver for over thirty years. An opening reception will take place on Friday, January 31st, from 6 – 10pm. Pirate is open Friday evenings from 6 – 10pm, Saturday & Sunday 12 – 5pm, and by appointment. “Ithaca” is being shown concurrently with the work of Jason Lee Gimbel in the Associate Space through February 16th.

“GREY TOWERS” REVIEWED IN ART LTD. by Monique Crine

“Not unlike Abstract Expressionism and Minimalism, hyperrealism has been a well of inspiration, for not just one generation of artists but several of them. Among hyperrealism’s current adherents is youngish Denver artist Monique Crine whose strikingly handsome solo “Grey Towers” was on view at Goodwin Fine Art earlier this summer. The reason that hyperrealism is sometimes called photo-realism is because the results–in paintings, drawings or watercolors–look, to a great extent, like photos. Crine creates art at a high standard in all these mediums and, in fact, she’s built parallel careers as a painter and as a photographer. Interestingly in this regard is the fact that though there are photos included in “Grey Towers” they aren’t by Crine, but instead were done by one of her grandfathers…”

http://www.artltdmag.com/index.php?subaction=showfull&id=1373652709&archive=&start_from=&ucat=32&

REVIEW OF “GREY TOWERS” IN WESTWORD by Monique Crine

“Crine’s paternal grandfather took a series of photos of the president when he was dedicating the Pinchot Institute for Conservation in Pennsylvania. (Crine’s paintings, like her grandfather’s photos, which are included in the show, are black and white.) Just two months later, Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas; Crine’s maternal grandfather witnessed the shooting and saw Lee Harvey Oswald in the Texas School Book Depository.

Because of the totemic character of the original news photos of Kennedy in Dallas, seeing any depiction of the president casually leaning against the back seat of an open Lincoln, lit by the full sun, inevitably brings the assassination to mind…”

The full review can be read here:

http://blogs.westword.com/showandtell/2013/05/realism_art_show_kirland_goodwin.php

“GREY TOWERS” TO OPEN AT TINA GOODWIN GALLERY by Monique Crine

FROM THE PRESS RELEASE:

Goodwin Fine Art is pleased to announce a showing of new work by Monique Crine.  The Denver-based artist is known for her photo-based/realist paintings.  This series focuses on images of JFK taken by her paternal grandfather in 1963, two months before JFK’s assassination.  The images are from the President’s dedication of Grey Towers, known today as the Pinchot Institute for Conservation, located in Milford, Pennsylvania, and 2013 serves as the 50-year anniversary of the dedication of the images, as well as Kennedy’s death.

The series of paintings tell a twofold narrative: The first is the subject of JFK prior to assassination, and the second is the relationship between the artist and her family, as connected by JFK.  In the artist’s own words Crine shares:

“I was further intrigued by this era in US history when I discovered that two months after my paternal Grandfather photographed him in Pennsylvania, my maternal Grandfather was a witness to the assassination of JFK in Dallas (and was also the witness who discovered Lee Harvey Oswald in the Texas School Book Depository Building).  Kennedy was significant to me not because of who he was as a president, but how he linked my families together.  I did not know my maternal Grandfather growing up nor as an adult, so this president and those photograph have (in a very abstract) way served as a stand-in.”   

More information can be found at www.goodwinfineart.com

DENVER POST: Denver artist Monique Crine wins Pollock-Krasner Grant by Monique Crine

Evidence of the health of an art scene can be found in many places, but certainly seeing members win national honors and awards is a good sign. The latest Denver artist to do just that is Monique Crine, who learned earlier this month that she is to receive a prestigious grant from the Pollock-Krasner Foundation in New York…

Rest of the article can be read at:

http://blogs.denverpost.com/artmosphere/2011/03/22/denver-artist-monique-crine-wins-pollock-krasner-grant/1557/

FACES, PLACES and SPACES: NEW WORK AT THE ARVADA CENTER by Monique Crine

FACES, PLACES and SPACES
EXHIBTION OPENS June 7- August 26, 2012
Opening Reception Thursday, June 7th from 6 to 9 p.m.

Curator Collin Parson invited me to create two new pieces for the exhibition. I had just inherited my grandfather’s photographs and chose to work from imagery that was not my own for the first time.

Michael Paglia’s review of the show can be read here:

http://www.westword.com/2012-07-26/culture/faces-places-spaces-arvada-center-review/

DENVER POST REVIEW OF TONY JAMES by Monique Crine

A modern Marlboro Man

Through Saturday. Where do you find today’s Marlboro Man? Monique Crine turned to — where else? — Craigslist. The Denver artist was looking for a model who would offer an updated take on that classic Western icon, and she found her man in Tony James, a wiry Texan who recently returned from duty as a soldier in Iraq. What results is a kind of photojournalistic series of 10 psychological portraits — all titled just “Tony” — on view in an exhibition that closes this weekend at the Ironton Gallery, 3636 Chestnut Place. But these works are not the expected photographs but technically sophisticated oils on canvas that subtly or sometimes overtly explore the complicated relationship between painting and photography. In these portraits, Crine probes questions of identity, individualism and how we envision cowboys and soldiers in a tech-driven 21st-century America that would seem to have little place for such potentially anachronistic archetypes. In some, Crine peers straight on at James, who is sometimes drinking a beer or smoking. But in others, she poses him more dramatically, including two canvases where he is seen in the mouth of a tunnel, mimicking a scene from “The Searchers.” These multiple dimensions give these pieces a conceptual depth often missing in much ultra-realistic figure painting, and they help explain why Crine is one of the most promising and exciting young artists on the Denver scene. The exhibition is on view 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. today and noon to 4 p.m. Saturday. Free. Irontonstudios.com or moniquecrine.com.  Kyle MacMillan

Read more: best bets theater – The Denver Post http://www.denverpost.com/search/ci_19722641#ixzz1jeYMWZVx