Lots and lots and lots of dogs by Monique Crine

When my sister was pregnant with her daughter she asked me to make a painting of her dog to hang above her crib to look over her. I made a quick painting of her dog and my two. 

As people saw them they began asking for dog paintings of their own. Since I was not a "dog painter" and instead a very serious artist I turned down possible commissions. Finally, I caved and made a few paintings for friends on the condition that they told no one. Eventually, the word got out that I am a dog painter (Fuck it. It's true.) and I've had the most fun making paintings for new and old friends. Here is a small gallery of some of the work I've made:

 

 

Front Page Coverage in the Denver Post for Year of the Dog! by Monique Crine

Ray Mark Rinaldi writes, "[Curator Armstrong] also brought into the show Denver artist Monique Crine’s series of exacting oil paintings of aging dogs. Working from photos she takes herself, Crine imbues her subjects with as much personality as a paintbrush can muster.

There’s a black lab named Idgie, caught with her tongue hanging out; a furry, floppy mix named Maddie whose brown eyes knowingly meet the gaze of the viewer. Each dog is accompanied by a statement about its unique charms and the joys it brought to caretakers over its lifetime.

Crine is a photorealist, and her paintings have a dual edge. In a recent show at the Museum of Contemporary Art Denver, she displayed portraits of professional football players after their career had ended. The paintings depicted successful, content guys, enjoying their hard-earned fortunes. But viewers knew the whole story and brought that to the experience of seeing them: These guys were past their prime, former heroes now on the sidelines.

The same feelings arise looking at her old dogs, each from a very happy home. They had it all but they’ll soon be goners, just an unfortunate byproduct of their limited lifespan. The dogs are joyful, but we get increasingly sad as we take them in.

There is a genuine poignancy in the juxtaposition of Crine’s spoiled beauties and Johnstone’s forsaken pups, and it says more about humans than it does about dogs..."

Full article can be found here: https://theknow.denverpost.com/2018/08/02/year-of-the-dog-colorado-springs/191416/

Visit to the Chateau de la Napoule in La Napoule, France by Monique Crine

I was invited by the La Napoule Art Foundation to visit their chateau in the south of France for two weeks in June so that I might do research on the kind of classes I'd like to lead during the summer of 2019. Such an incredible experience. The accommodations, food, WINE, art studio, environment and especially the staff were unmatched and unforgettable. I hope these photos give you a glimpse into my experience, as well as what your experience could be like next summer!!! The wheels are spinning and my heart and belly are full! Details for next summer's workshop will be posted as soon as I have them :)

Denver Post covers Made in Colorado exhibit by Monique Crine

 David, 2015, Oil on Canvas, 24" x 36"

David, 2015, Oil on Canvas, 24" x 36"

My painting of David was selected to be a part of “Made in Colorado,” a sweeping survey of contemporary work created by 40 artists and set up in the Emmanuel Gallery on the Auraria campus and Gallery 808 in the Santa Fe Arts District. Curated by visiting jurors Olga Viso and Cameron Gainer, the exhibition was designed from more than 1,000 submitted pieces, and "that included several of the state’s most commercially successful artists, a handful of esteemed art-school professors and a slew of promising newcomers.

The end result includes artists from all those categories and, in that way, offers a complete picture of where Colorado art is now and where it may be going."

A link to the full article can be found here: https://theknow.denverpost.com/2018/07/13/made-in-colorado-exhibit-denver/189625/

Harvard Lecture & Workshop - 5th year in a row! by Monique Crine

I don't know how I got so lucky, but this year was my fifth year in a row being invited back to the Harvard Graduate School of Design to present a lecture about my work, as well as an accompanying workshop that focused on the representation of surface texture. So much gratitude to the amazing students who created beautiful paintings, and to the wonderful women who welcomed me back - Hannah and Ewa. 

Richard, 1961 featured on CBS THIS MORNING by Monique Crine

Screen Shot 2018-01-04 at 5.24.35 PM.PNG

I don't even know how to be cool about this! CBS THIS MORNING featured my painting of Richard, 1961 back in October as part of their coverage of the Scrimmage exhibition in Canton, OH. Beyond speechless and beyond grateful. A link to the story can be found at: https://www.cbsnews.com/video/scrimmage-art-exhibit-tackles-the-culture-of-football/

Museum of Boulder Tour & Upcoming Exhibition by Monique Crine

 Monique Crine & Rick George 

Monique Crine & Rick George 

So many thanks to Carolyn Booth, the Director of Development and Communication, for giving Rick and I a tour of Museum of Boulder while its under construction. My upcoming exhibition of paintings chronicling the life of Coach Bill McCartney will show here. More details about the museum can be found at the following link:

https://museumofboulder.org

 

studio visit with Rob Francois by Monique Crine

Had a fabulous afternoon with Rob Francois as he visited my studio to see his portraits from my 2015 exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art Denver, Critical Focus: Monique Crine. The series was titled Eden Prairie

Rob posed for me in Minneapolis, MN as he recovered from an injury sustained during his career as a linebacker for the NFL. He last played for the Green Bay Packers who he won Super Bowl XLV with against the Pittsburgh Steelers. Rob was signed by the Minnesota Vikings as an undrafted free agent in 2009 after playing college football at Boston College. He's now a recruiter for the Kansas City Cheifs. 

Such an incredibly wise and powerful soul. Couldn't have asked for a better subject or friend. 

 

CRINE RETurns to Harvard for final graduate critiques by Monique Crine

I was invited back to Harvard's GSD this year to participate in final critiques. Images show my mad critiquing skills, as well as my ability to wear floral in a sea of black :) 

CRINE PRESENTS HARVARD LECTURE AND WORKSHOP FOR THE FOURTH YEAR IN A ROW by Monique Crine

This year I was invited back for my fourth year in a row to present a lecture on my work, as well as an accompanying workshop that focused on painting the figure from photographs. 

Photoshoot with Magic Johnson by Monique Crine

I had the unique pleasure of photographing Magic Johnson during his recent visit to Denver, CO. More details about his interest in the mile high city, and his commitment to women and minority owned business, can be found at the following link:

https://denver.eater.com/2016/11/30/13793370/untitled

KVAL, Channel 13, Eugene, Oregon features Scrimmage in Sports Broadcast! by Monique Crine

 KVAL Sports Broadcast on  FRIDAY, JULY 29TH 2016

KVAL Sports Broadcast on FRIDAY, JULY 29TH 2016

Eugene's local news did a feature on the Scrimmage exhibition currently up at the University of Oregon, which features my painting of my dad, Richard, 1961

As mentioned in the article accompanying the video:

The work ranges from a 1857 wood engraving by Winslow Homer to recent works by contemporary artists Monique Crine, Shaun Leonardo, Catherine Opie and William Wylie.

To watch the full video please follow the link:

http://kval.com/sports/content/museum-exhibit-scrimmage-explores-football-in-american-art

CU/University of Oregon Game by Monique Crine

I had an incredible time photographing the University of Colorado, Boulder / Oregon Ducks game in Eugene this past weekend. The resulting photographs will be part of my ongoing work on the American football player. Thrilled to start developing the images upon my return to Denver!

Richard, 1962 to be used for all press material at Scrimmage Exhibition at U of O! by Monique Crine

The staff at the University of Oregon's Schnitzer Museum of Art just emailed me over the first banner they had printed for the exhibition, "Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present." And whose painting is the featured image from a show that includes Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and Catherine Opie? Mine!!! 

I'm so flattered they chose the painting of my father that I did a few years back, which CSU has since acquired. I think my dad is pretty tickled as well.

I'm looking forward to lecturing there in the fall and possibly watching a football game or two with my guy. Too cool! 

Mystery & Narrative at SLATE Contemporary Art in Oakland, CA by Monique Crine

I am thrilled to participate in a group show at SLATE Gallery in Oakland, CA. Details are as follows: 

Per the press release:

Denver artist Monique Crine’s work as a painter is deeply informed by her work as a photographer. On first glance, her paintings give the illusion of the photographs that they are a reference to; but upon closer examination, the subtle brushwork and unique texture of oil on canvas reveals the object’s true identity. This revelation gives a special weight to her scenes, and calls upon us as viewers to question what it means to us that this object before us is a painting rather than a photograph, and could have been invented rather than having the photographic aura of ‘reality.’

The portraits that Crine creates, first in extended photography shoots with her subjects and then on the canvas, are steeped in narrative, informed by mid- twentieth century cinema, film noir, and current media styles. Cheryl, (from Crine’s Burlwood series of familial women), vibrates with drama — from the pained expression the subject is wearing, to the high contrast shadows that shroud her, to the over-the-top vintage movie poster that the subject seems to emerge from: “SHE GAVE HER SOUL TO SAVE A LIFE!.”

Rob (II) (from Crine’s most recent Eden Prairie series of portraits of professional football players), is similarly posed and composed, but this subject is more guarded behind thick panes of glass that mostly obscure his form and a stubbornly sealed expression. Both portraits offer explorations of archetypes as they play out in the spectrum from fictionalized spectacle to ‘real’ life, as well drawing our attention to the importance of medium to convey a message.